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raw-fed-pets:

Just a few tips for feeding bones safely to your dog.There are two types of bones raw feeders usually feed:
Recreational Bone (left):
-The primary purpose of rec bones is for teeth cleaning. They are very effective in this regard. Warning: Expect reflective pearly whites.
-Feed a few times a week as it suits. Ideally feeding large everyday would be good, but many people don’t have the freezer space for this.
-Must be meaty. Bare bones crack teeth and wear them down over time. Mustn’t be the weight-bearing bones of large animals (e.g. legs) as these also break teeth. Give your dog a meaty chunk he can sink his teeth into.
-Should be large to prevent your dog choking. Aim for a bone that is larger than your dogs head.
-These bones are generally not used as an edible bone/calcium source, but more as a meaty meal or activity (may cause constipation if whole bone fed). You can remove the bone once the dog has worked away all the meat. These bones also work out your dogs muscles, occupy his mind, and allow him to engage in instinctual behavior. Chewing also appears to be very calming for the dog (endorphins perhaps?). If your dog didn’t finish it, simply refreeze it for next time.
Edible bone (right): 
-Around 10% of Prey Model Diet, but you can balance it out over the week/fortnight, as you would with your own diet. Doesn’t need to be exact, but I wouldn’t recommend feeding less than 10%, or more than 25% on a regular basis. If your dogs feces is white, you are feeding too much bone.
-Feed frozen if you have a gulper. Its a case of ‘know-your-dog’. Do not take any unnecessary risks with nervous fast eaters, or those that try to swallow food whole.
-Should be soft bone. Poultry, rabbit, and young animals (brisket/veal etc) are some examples. Raw chicken is the most commonly fed edible bone due to it being extremely soft and digestible. There is also a lot of information available about the bone percentage of chicken (usda database- click ‘full report’ on chosen meat e.g. wings are approx 38% bone).  Such bone is broken down into a gel-like substance in the dogs stomach.
-Introduce bone slowly to your dogs diet. Most start on bland boneless chicken for 1-2 weeks until their system has adjusted. If he/she has been eating kibble or processed food then his/her stomach is likely more alkaline than a raw fed dog’s, and needs time to adjust before tackling raw bone. Raw fed dogs have a natural highly acidic stomach PH level. This is effective for many reasons, primarily being the breakdown of bones and the prevention of food borne bacterial illness (unless immune compromised) when eating raw meat and offal.
-Feed edible bone that is size appropriate. Feeding a big dog chicken necks may present a choking hazard. Big dogs often do well on chicken frames, whereas toy dogs can eat smaller bones.
General Tips:
*It is recommend that you do not exercise your dog 1-2 hrs before, and after feeding any kind of food. This can increase the risk of bloat which can be deadly in minutes. Large breeds are more at risk. Encourage your dog to rest after dinner, and think about splitting his meal into 2-3 per day if he is an at-risk breed.
*Never ever feed cooked bones, as these are dangerous.Cooking changes the molecular structure of bones causing them to become brittle and easily splintered.
*Most of these apply to cats too, although they do well with just edible bone rather than rec bones.
*Always supervise the feeding of bones.
If Ive missed anything out feel free to add it. Photo on the right wasn’t meant to look so questionable. Bone Appetit.
Zoom Info
raw-fed-pets:

Just a few tips for feeding bones safely to your dog.There are two types of bones raw feeders usually feed:
Recreational Bone (left):
-The primary purpose of rec bones is for teeth cleaning. They are very effective in this regard. Warning: Expect reflective pearly whites.
-Feed a few times a week as it suits. Ideally feeding large everyday would be good, but many people don’t have the freezer space for this.
-Must be meaty. Bare bones crack teeth and wear them down over time. Mustn’t be the weight-bearing bones of large animals (e.g. legs) as these also break teeth. Give your dog a meaty chunk he can sink his teeth into.
-Should be large to prevent your dog choking. Aim for a bone that is larger than your dogs head.
-These bones are generally not used as an edible bone/calcium source, but more as a meaty meal or activity (may cause constipation if whole bone fed). You can remove the bone once the dog has worked away all the meat. These bones also work out your dogs muscles, occupy his mind, and allow him to engage in instinctual behavior. Chewing also appears to be very calming for the dog (endorphins perhaps?). If your dog didn’t finish it, simply refreeze it for next time.
Edible bone (right): 
-Around 10% of Prey Model Diet, but you can balance it out over the week/fortnight, as you would with your own diet. Doesn’t need to be exact, but I wouldn’t recommend feeding less than 10%, or more than 25% on a regular basis. If your dogs feces is white, you are feeding too much bone.
-Feed frozen if you have a gulper. Its a case of ‘know-your-dog’. Do not take any unnecessary risks with nervous fast eaters, or those that try to swallow food whole.
-Should be soft bone. Poultry, rabbit, and young animals (brisket/veal etc) are some examples. Raw chicken is the most commonly fed edible bone due to it being extremely soft and digestible. There is also a lot of information available about the bone percentage of chicken (usda database- click ‘full report’ on chosen meat e.g. wings are approx 38% bone).  Such bone is broken down into a gel-like substance in the dogs stomach.
-Introduce bone slowly to your dogs diet. Most start on bland boneless chicken for 1-2 weeks until their system has adjusted. If he/she has been eating kibble or processed food then his/her stomach is likely more alkaline than a raw fed dog’s, and needs time to adjust before tackling raw bone. Raw fed dogs have a natural highly acidic stomach PH level. This is effective for many reasons, primarily being the breakdown of bones and the prevention of food borne bacterial illness (unless immune compromised) when eating raw meat and offal.
-Feed edible bone that is size appropriate. Feeding a big dog chicken necks may present a choking hazard. Big dogs often do well on chicken frames, whereas toy dogs can eat smaller bones.
General Tips:
*It is recommend that you do not exercise your dog 1-2 hrs before, and after feeding any kind of food. This can increase the risk of bloat which can be deadly in minutes. Large breeds are more at risk. Encourage your dog to rest after dinner, and think about splitting his meal into 2-3 per day if he is an at-risk breed.
*Never ever feed cooked bones, as these are dangerous.Cooking changes the molecular structure of bones causing them to become brittle and easily splintered.
*Most of these apply to cats too, although they do well with just edible bone rather than rec bones.
*Always supervise the feeding of bones.
If Ive missed anything out feel free to add it. Photo on the right wasn’t meant to look so questionable. Bone Appetit.
Zoom Info

raw-fed-pets:

Just a few tips for feeding bones safely to your dog.There are two types of bones raw feeders usually feed:

Recreational Bone (left):

-The primary purpose of rec bones is for teeth cleaning. They are very effective in this regard. Warning: Expect reflective pearly whites.

-Feed a few times a week as it suits. Ideally feeding large everyday would be good, but many people don’t have the freezer space for this.

-Must be meaty. Bare bones crack teeth and wear them down over time. Mustn’t be the weight-bearing bones of large animals (e.g. legs) as these also break teeth. Give your dog a meaty chunk he can sink his teeth into.

-Should be large to prevent your dog choking. Aim for a bone that is larger than your dogs head.

-These bones are generally not used as an edible bone/calcium source, but more as a meaty meal or activity (may cause constipation if whole bone fed). You can remove the bone once the dog has worked away all the meat. These bones also work out your dogs muscles, occupy his mind, and allow him to engage in instinctual behavior. Chewing also appears to be very calming for the dog (endorphins perhaps?). If your dog didn’t finish it, simply refreeze it for next time.

Edible bone (right):

-Around 10% of Prey Model Diet, but you can balance it out over the week/fortnight, as you would with your own diet. Doesn’t need to be exact, but I wouldn’t recommend feeding less than 10%, or more than 25% on a regular basis. If your dogs feces is white, you are feeding too much bone.

-Feed frozen if you have a gulper. Its a case of ‘know-your-dog’. Do not take any unnecessary risks with nervous fast eaters, or those that try to swallow food whole.

-Should be soft bone. Poultry, rabbit, and young animals (brisket/veal etc) are some examples. Raw chicken is the most commonly fed edible bone due to it being extremely soft and digestible. There is also a lot of information available about the bone percentage of chicken (usda database- click ‘full report’ on chosen meat e.g. wings are approx 38% bone).  Such bone is broken down into a gel-like substance in the dogs stomach.

-Introduce bone slowly to your dogs diet. Most start on bland boneless chicken for 1-2 weeks until their system has adjusted. If he/she has been eating kibble or processed food then his/her stomach is likely more alkaline than a raw fed dog’s, and needs time to adjust before tackling raw bone. Raw fed dogs have a natural highly acidic stomach PH level. This is effective for many reasons, primarily being the breakdown of bones and the prevention of food borne bacterial illness (unless immune compromised) when eating raw meat and offal.

-Feed edible bone that is size appropriate. Feeding a big dog chicken necks may present a choking hazard. Big dogs often do well on chicken frames, whereas toy dogs can eat smaller bones.

General Tips:

*It is recommend that you do not exercise your dog 1-2 hrs before, and after feeding any kind of food. This can increase the risk of bloat which can be deadly in minutes. Large breeds are more at risk. Encourage your dog to rest after dinner, and think about splitting his meal into 2-3 per day if he is an at-risk breed.

*Never ever feed cooked bones, as these are dangerous.Cooking changes the molecular structure of bones causing them to become brittle and easily splintered.

*Most of these apply to cats too, although they do well with just edible bone rather than rec bones.

*Always supervise the feeding of bones.

If Ive missed anything out feel free to add it. Photo on the right wasn’t meant to look so questionable. Bone Appetit.

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